Dear Esther - Le Bottin des Jeux Linux

Dear Esther

Specifications

Title: Dear Esther Type: Windows
Genre: Adventure & Action Status:
Category: Adventure & Action ➤ Kinetic Novel ➤ Misc. Commercial: ✓
Tags: Walking Sim; Exploration; Narrative; Interactive Fiction; Kinetic Novel; Adventure; Linear; Relaxing; Mystery; Short; Casual; Story Rich; Story-driven; Atmospheric; Experimental Demo:
Released: Not Tracking Package Name:
Date: Extern Repo:
License: Commercial Deb Repo:
View: First person Package:
Graphic: 3D Binary:
Mechanics: Real Time Source:
Played: Single PDA:
Quality (record): 5 stars Quality (game):
Contrib.: Goupil & Louis ID: 14746
Created: 2015-05-07 Updated: 2019-04-22

Summary

[fr]: Une Kinetic Novel expérimentale, l'interaction avec le joueur / lecteur est minimaliste, se concentrant sur l'histoire, contée par le biais d'un récit épistolaire dont le joueur prend connaissance à travers l'exploration d'une île sans nom dans les Hébrides [en]: A ghost story, told using first-person gaming technologies. Rather than traditional game-play the focus here is on exploration, uncovering the mystery of the island, of who you are and why you are here

Videos

Trailer / Gameplay [en] / [en] / [fr] :

Links

Website & videos
[Homepage] [Dev site] [Features/About] [Screenshots] [Videos t t t r r r g g g[fr] g g g] [Reviews] [WIKI] [FAQ] [RSS] [Changelog 1 2]

Commercial : [Online store] [Humble Store] [Steam ((Windows)]

Resources
• (empty)
Technical informations
[Open Hub] [PCGamingWiki]

Social
Devs (The Chinese Room [fr] [en]) : [Site 1 2] [twitter] [YouTube] [Interview 1 2]
Devs (Robert Briscoe [fr] [en]) : [Site 1 2] [twitter] [YouTube] [Interview 1 2]
Port by (Ryan C. Gordon [fr] [en]) : [Site 1 2] [Patreon] [Forums] [mastodon] [twitter] [YouTube] [Interview 1 2 3 4 5]
Game : [Blog] [Forums] [twitter] [YouTube]

On other sites
[Wikipedia (Dear Esther) [fr] [en]]

Reviews
[metacritic]

News / Source of this Entry (SotE) / News (SotN)

Description [fr]

Basé sur une version modifiée de Wine (CodeWeavers).

Une Kinetic Novel, par le studio The Chinese Room & Robert Briscoe (publié par le studio The Chinese Room), portage Linux en cours par Ryan C. Gordon.
Il utilise une version modifiée du moteur Source.

Dear Esther est une Kinetic Novel expérimentale, l'interaction avec le joueur / lecteur est minimaliste, se concentrant sur l'histoire, contée par le biais d'un récit épistolaire dont le joueur prend connaissance à travers l'exploration d'une île sans nom dans les Hébrides (îles situées à l'ouest de l'Écosse).

-- inspiré / repris de la page Wikipedia


Concernant le "portage Linux" :

A noter que - selon wikipedia [en], le portage Linux est basé sur une version modifiée de Wine (CodeWeavers) et ne peut donc être considéré comme un portage Linux natif authentique.
Un portage par Ryan C. Gordon est en cours mais non encore opérationnel.



Wikipedia :

Dear Esther est un jeu vidéo développé par le studio indépendant The Chinese Room, sorti en 2012 sur PC (Microsoft Windows et Linux) ainsi qu'OS X.

Jeu vidéo expérimental, il a été publié en juin 2008 en tant que mod du moteur de jeu Source, avant d'être entièrement réaménagé entre 2009 et 2011 pour une sortie commerciale en 2012.

Le jeu ne suit pas les conventions traditionnelles des jeux vidéo, car il impose une interaction minimale du lecteur et ne nécessite pas de choix à faire, ni de tâches à accomplir. Au lieu de cela, il se concentre sur son histoire, qui est racontée par le biais d'un récit épistolaire dont le joueur prend connaissance à travers l'exploration d'une île sans nom dans les Hébrides.

Le jeu a notamment été nommé au Independent Games Festival 2012 dont il a reçu le prix Excellence in Visual Art.



The Linux port is based on a custom version of Wine by CodeWeavers, and is therefore treated as a non-genuine native port. A native Linux build by Ryan C. Gordon was being developed for the same bundle, but was "not quite ready yet" in June 2013. As of August 2013, a Linux version of Dear Esther is neither available via the game's official website nor via Steam. It is, however, available via the Ubuntu Software Center.

Description [en]

“A deserted island… a lost man… memories of a fatal crash… a book written by a dying explorer.”

Dear Esther is a ghost story, told using first-person gaming technologies. Rather than traditional game-play the focus here is on exploration, uncovering the mystery of the island, of who you are and why you are here. Fragments of story are randomly uncovered when exploring the various locations of the island, making every each journey a unique experience. Dear Esther features a stunning, specially commissioned soundtrack from Jessica Curry.

Forget the normal rules of play; if nothing seems real here, it’s because it may just be all a delusion. What is the significance of the aerial – What happened on the motorway – is the island real or imagined – who is Esther and why has she chosen to summon you here? The answers are out there, on the lost beach and the tunnels under the island. Or then again, they may just not be, after all…

History

Built in the Source engine and originally released in 2008 as a mod for Half Life 2, Dear Esther quickly established itself as an award-winning, critically acclaimed experimental first-person game. It abandons all traditional game play, leaving only a rich world soaked in atmosphere, and an abstract, poetic story to explore.

In 2009, it was picked up by a professional game artist, Robert Briscoe, for a complete overhaul of the visuals and level design, in the hopes that it would be able to overcome it’s early shortcomings as a mod and be able to fulfil its true potential.

In late 2010 it became clear the overhaul had become something much more, and with Valve and the community’s support the project was granted a license to make Dear Esther a completely independent release, and allowing everyone the opportunity to get a chance to experience the game for themselves!

The Team

Dan Pinchbeck – Writer and Producer
Robert Briscoe – Artist & Level Designer (and everything in-between!)
Jessica Curry – Composer
Jack Morgan – Coder
Nigel Carrington – Voice Acting
Ben Andrews – Concept Art
Samuel Justice – Audio Mastering Engineer





Wikipedia:
Dear Esther is a first-person art video game developed by The Chinese Room for Microsoft Windows, Mac OS X and Linux.[a] First released in June 2008 as a free modification for the Source video game engine, the game was entirely redeveloped between 2009 and 2011 for a commercial release in February 2012. The game does not follow traditional video game conventions, as it involves minimal interaction from the player and does not require choices to be made nor tasks to be completed. It instead places focus on its story, which is told through a fragmented, epistolary narrative as the player explores an unnamed island in the Hebrides.

The status of Dear Esther as a video game has been contested by reviewers, but the game nonetheless received a positive critical reception following its release on February 14, 2012.

Gameplay and plot

In Dear Esther, the player explores an uninhabited Hebridean island, listening to a series of voiced-over letter fragments to a woman named Esther. The narrator's identity is not specified, but there are suggestions he is Esther's husband and that she is dead, killed in a car accident. The player hears these monologue fragments as they reach certain points on the island, and are chosen by the game semi-randomly; this means that different playthroughs generate slight differences in the story, as certain readings are played while others inevitably get omitted. In his letters, the narrator refers to several other unseen characters. One is a cartographer named Donnelly, who charted the island in the past. The narrator refers to Donnelly's book frequently in his letters. Another character, Paul, is suggested to have been the drunk driver in the car accident that killed Esther. The narrator also details the life of Jakobson, an eighteenth-century shepherd who lived on the island. The identities of the narrator, Esther, Paul, Donnelly and Jakobson become more blurred as the game progresses, as the narration moves between topics and relates the characters in different ways. The random selection of voice-over parts causes ambiguity and forces the player to draw their own conclusions of the story.

At the game's end, the player reaches the radio mast atop the island's peak and climbs a ladder to the top of the tower during a final monologue by the narrator. As the player jumps off and falls to the shore below, their shadow becomes that of a bird. The player soars through the island's bay before flying low over an array of paper boats in the water—the many letters the narrator had written to Esther.


The Linux port

The Linux port is based on a custom version of Wine by CodeWeavers, and is therefore treated as a non-genuine native port. A native Linux build by Ryan C. Gordon was being developed for the same bundle, but was "not quite ready yet" in June 2013. As of August 2013, a Linux version of Dear Esther is neither available via the game's official website nor via Steam. It is, however, available via the Ubuntu Software Center.